Posted on

Update: 11 more bomb threats target Jewish Community Centers. Ivanka Trump responds

(CNN)Samantha Taylor was at Orlando’s Jewish Community Center for a morning meeting when she heard reports of a bomb threat crackle from the director’s walkie-talkie.

Her daughter attends preschool there; she ran to the classroom and evacuated with the students and teachers.
While police and bomb-sniffing dogs searched the building for several hours, the teachers kept the children calm and happy at a safe spot down the street, Taylor said. No explosives were found.
    On the same day, January 4, an Orlando Chabad center also received a threatening call, marking the first trickle in what would soon swell to waves of calls menacing Jewish institutions across the country.
    In all, 48 JCCs in 26 states and one Canadian province received nearly 60 bomb threats during January, according to the JCCA, an association of JCCs. Most were made in rapid succession on three days: January 9, 18 and 31. A number of JCCs, including Orlando’s, received multiple threats.
    On Monday, another wave of bomb threats hit 11 JCCs across the country, bringing the total to 69 incidents targeting 54 JCCs in 27 states, according to the JCCA.
    Also on Monday, Ivanka Trump, who converted to Judaism, tweeted: “America is a nation built on the principle of religious tolerance. We must protect our houses of worship & religious centers. #JCC”.
    Ivanka Trump is the first member of the Trump family to comment on the bomb threats. The next day, President Donald Trump himself denounced the JCC bomb threats and anti-Semitism in general.
    “The anti-Semitic threats targeting our Jewish community and community centers are horrible and are painful and a very sad reminder of the work that still must be done to root out hate and prejudice and evil,” Trump said after a tour of the National Museum of African American Museum and Culture.
    In a statement, the FBI said the bureau and the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division are “investigating possible civil rights violations in connections with threats to Jewish Community Centers across the country.”
    On Tuesday, the Simon Wiesenthal Center urged Attorney General Jeff Sessions to appoint a special task force to catch the culprit, or culprits, behind the bomb threats.
    “The multi-pronged threats of anti-Semitism today demand concerted action,” said Rabbis Marvin Hier and Abraham Cooper, of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, a leading Jewish human rights organization.
    The JTA, a Jewish news agency, says it has obtained a recording of one of the calls. On it, the caller says a C-4 bomb has been placed in the JCC and that “a large number of Jews are going to be slaughtered.”

    Jewish

    Since the threats began, Kveller has run at least five columns about them. Some of the writers are distraught. “Did the people who decided to call in a bomb threat wish it was real?” asked one mother. “Did they think about my babies and wish that they could really blow them up?”
    Others columnists were more defiant. “I’m not scared to be a proud Jewish mother in the United States of America in 2017,” wrote Jordana Horn, “and neither should you be.”
    Other Jewish mothers say they don’t know what to make of the bomb threats, or how they should react.
    “The question is: How serious is it?” said Elissa Strauss, a parenting columnist for Slate whose son attends a JCC preschool. “That’s what I, as a Jew and a parent, am trying to work out. I don’t think I have a clear understanding of what I’m supposed to do right now, besides not give in.”
    Strauss said the relative lack of media coverage about the threats adds to her perplexity. She’s not alone: “48 U.S. Jewish Centers Received Bomb Threats in Past Month,” ran a headline in Haaretz. “‘Why Is No One Talking About This?'”
    Parents are asking: Is it because no bombs have exploded? Because the protection of children is seen primarily as a “women’s issue”? Because Trump’s chaotic new administration dominates news cycles? Or because JCC leaders are trying to quiet the story for fear of panicking parents and losing students?
    Ivy Harlev, director of the JCC in Wilmington, Delaware, which received two bomb threats last month, says she is “torn” about whether more media should have covered the threats.
    “I don’t want that kind of negative attention, but I want to make sure that people know that we are a secure place, and that we have the support of local law enforcement.”
    Like many JCCs that have received threats, Harlev’s quickly assembled a town hall so parents could question administrators, local police and FBI representatives. Two families decided to withdraw their children from the JCC’s early childhood education program, Harlev said.
    In Albany, Orlando and elsewhere, JCC staffers have tried to bolster security — and ease parents’ peace of mind — by closing entrances, blocking phone calls from unknown numbers and posting bollards to block vehicles from getting close to their buildings.
    At least one family was satisfied by the changes.
    For nearly four years, Melissa Braillard, a mother of two in Orlando, had sent her children to the JCC. She knew and liked the teachers, the administrators, the other parents and their children.
    “I feel like I had a support system, and people cared for us.”
    But after the third bomb threat and weeks of worrying, Braillard removed her children from the JCC. “I need to keep my kids safe,” she thought at the time.
    A few weeks later, though, Braillard agreed to return to the Orlando JCC to see its security improvements. She came away impressed.
    Because her son would be starting kindergarten soon at another school anyway, he is not returning to the JCC. But her daughter will be back in the classroom on Monday.
    On March 8, the Orlando JCC is holding a fundraiser, where it hopes to raise $200,000 to help the center break even for the year. It has already found three donors to match donations, potentially quadrupling the windfall.
    Meanwhile, parents like Taylor, the mother who witnessed the first bomb threat, are determined to keep the doors open. “Our JCC isn’t going anywhere,” she said, “and that’s the most important message.”

    Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/16/living/jcc-bomb-threats-anti-semitism/index.html

    Posted on

    OK Cupid revamps to be less like Tinder, more political

    Just in time for Valentines Day (ugh, sorry), dating app OK Cupid is getting a makeover. Psych! Just kidding, the company is introducinga new version of its mobile app today, but OK Cupidsfull redesignwont actually roll out until March. Though the timing of the announcement is clearly manufactured, the overhaul itself is fairly significant. In addition to getting a whole newaesthetic, complete with updatedtypography and new illustrations, the apps feature set is being made over as well, in an effortto further differentiate itself from Tinders hot or not game.

    The prior version of the OK Cupid app featured a section called Quickmatch, which was effectively OKCsown version of Tinder. In the new appout today, Quickmatch has been rebranded as DoubleTake, and is walking itself back from a focus only on the datersleading photo.

    old-vs-new-doubletake

    Above: Old Quickmatch (left) vs New DoubleTake (right)

    While youre still swiping to move through this matching interface, youre now being shown multiple photos all on one page, as well as various details about the personin question, including their profile text. The idea, the company explains, is to give users a deeper look into someones personality right from the start.

    This new screen, which is also the apps main screen that loads upon first launch, will include up four photos, the username, age, location, percentage match, plus other details pulled out of from the user profile, like height, whether they have dogs, have kids, personality traits like friendly, energetic, organized, and more.

    These are displayed alongside icons, like a paw print for dogs, or a beach ball for kids, for example.A brief user profile summary appears below.

    doubletake

    With DoubleTake, we show many more facets of a person were showing what makes people tick so that youll have better dates and better relationships, explains OK Cupid CEO Elie Seidman in a statement about the apps makeover. Every person has a story and instead of helping users speed up, DoubleTake slows them down within the swiping interface so that they can appreciate each others uniqueness, he added.

    Seidman, formerly the co-founder and CEO of TripAdvisor-owned Oyster, came on board with OK Cupid in May of last year, with a goal of shifting the brand to one thats more focused on meaningful relationships, as compared with apps like Tinder, which are still often confused (or used) as tools for quick hookups. This is a tactic othersin the space have taken as well, including most recently Hinge, which pivoted to a new experience itself in October, alsoclaiming a renewed focus on real relationships.

    DoubleTake was tested with select members ahead of todays public launch, and was found to have tripled the mutual matches, OK Cupid claims.

    questions-2

    Of course, it doesnt matter to OK Cupid parent company Match Group which dating app aesthetic you prefer, only that theyre notably differentfrom oneanother. Match Group owns not only Match.com and OKC, but also Tinder, Meetic, Twoo, OurTime, BlackPeopleMeet, and others.

    In addition to thisslowed down matching, OK Cupid is also doubling down on its question-and-answer feature. Long one of the apps standout differentiators, the app will now receive annual updates to keep this section fresh with more relevant and timely questions that can help daters find people who share their values.

    In this day and age, that means political values, it seems.

    The new release includes 50 addedquestions, some of which are controversial topics for debate like how you feel about Trumps Muslim ban, whether you believe in climate change, or even how you feel about Trump himself.

    There are also questions reflective of various dating focused topics, like ghosting.

    trump

    The upcomingrevamp, however, includes a new look-and-feel for OK Cupid across its platform on both web and mobile. Things will be organized a bit differently,but the most noticeable changes are the new typography and theillustrations.

    categories

    The company commissioned Berlin-based artist Jay Daniel Wright, who has done illustrations for The New York Times, Bloomberg Businessweek, and Die Ziet, to create unique designs to accompany the apps various sections. The illustrations are bright and colorful, and are meant to impart a modern and progressive vibe thats something a company founded in 2004 could probably use.

    The updated OK Cupid is live today on iOS and Androidwith DoubleTake, butthe larger redesign is planned for March.

    1. assemble

    2. onboard-1

    3. onboard-2

    4. questions-2

    5. questions

    6. doubletake

    7. questions-mobile

    8. trump

    9. email

    10. old-vs-new-doubletake

    Read more: https://techcrunch.com/2017/02/14/ok-cupid-revamps-to-be-less-like-tinder-more-political/

    Posted on

    Yelp launches new feature for asking and answering questions about any business

    Yelp is releasing a new feature with the simple, self-explanatory name Questions and Answers.

    Well, mostly self-explanatory. This is distinct from Talk, a feature where Yelp users can ask an incredibly broad range of questions (as I write this, the New York page currently includes conversations about the travel time to the airport, when its legal to kick out a roommate and The Bachelorette).

    Instead, these are questions and answers tied to a specific venue, a focus that could make this stand out from other Q&A products. For example, you could ask how long visitors normally stay at the Kennedy Space Center or if a bar allows dogs or about pricing at a tattoo parlor, then get answers from other users, or from the business owner themselves.

    Users can upvote and downvote the answers based on how helpful they are, and they can also sign up for notifications whenever a specific question gets answered.

    Yelp

    Product Manager Brian Boshes described this as great, Yelp-y content that can help people find the information thats important to them (which might be mentioned in some reviews, but could be tough to find). He also noted that this is a potentially limitless way for someone whos a supporter or fan of a business to stay engaged with their Yelp page they cant keep posting reviews, but they can keep answering questions.

    Lastly, Boshes said this provides valuable data for Yelp about what users are looking for. If people keep asking about something (say, the kid-friendliness of a restaurant), then maybe its time for Yelp to add that as a piece of information in every profile.

    Yelp ran a limited pilot of this feature late last year and is now rolling it out nationwide on iPhone, Android and desktop. Youll see the Q&A section pop in above the review section of Yelp profiles.

    Read more: https://techcrunch.com/2017/02/14/yelp-q-and-a/

    Posted on

    Does a new ‘Watch Dogs 2’ ending hint at the next game?

    Image: Ubisoft

    A new update for Watch Dogs 2 includes a very specific hint that could be a reference to the location of the next game in the series.

    Before we go any further, consider this your spoiler warning. If you haven’t finished the story in Watch Dogs 2, go do that before diving in on fan theories.

    That’s what we’re looking at here: evidence-supported fan theories.

    The update makes a number of changes, the most notable being a new, longer edit of the game’s final cutscene. The original message from Dedsec the heroic, anti-establishment hacker group at the center of the story is now accompanied by something new: A recorded phone call.

    The identity of the two male speakers is unknown, but they’re talking about the growing presence of Deadsec and other “hacktivist” cells around the world, specifically name-dropping the Middle East, South America and Europe.

    That’s not the important bit, however. Take a look at the cutscene yourself and see if you can figure out what’s got everyone talking…

    Spot it?

    It’s the filename of the recorded message. Those numbers are map coordinates. Punch them into Google Maps (or, you know, use a real map) and you’ll land at the Brixton Market in London.

    The prevailing theory, as you might imagine: London is the setting of Watch Dogs 3. A sequel hasn’t been announced or anything Watch Dogs 2 is barely three months old but why else would the newly edited ending include map coordinates??

    There’s a lot more to the patch as well. In addition to bug fixes and balance changes, “Title Update 1.11” adds new locations to the world (including a “hobo city”) as well as new clothing, emotes and dances.

    A lot of this is meant to get the game ready for “Human Conditions,” an upcoming story add-on which should be out before the end of June.

    Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/02/15/watch-dogs-2-update-111-ending-cutscene-/

    Posted on

    Google Arts and Culture finally exposes Bush family’s favorite taco recipe

    Lyndon B Johnson's dogs, Him & Her
    Image: FRANCIS MILLER/LIFE PHOTO COLLECTION

    This Presidents’ Day, you can take a step back in time and learn about our former Commanders-in-Chief thanks to a handy new feature from Google.

    Google Arts and Culture has partnered with institutions, libraries and museums across the United States to deliver presidential media directly on our screens. Some of the displays are definitely catered to the history buffs, like an exhibit of significant events in the path toward American democracy. But other sections can be enjoyed by casual observers, like the gallery of presidential pets.

    Did you know that Theodore Roosevelt kept a lion cub, a bear, an antelope, a wallaby and a bobcat in the White House, alongside dogs and cats? Neither did we.

    Other gems that you can view include the Bush family’s favorite taco recipe, handwritten by Barbara Bush (hint: it contains Doritos) and also a walk through of Thomas Jefferson’s life from boyhood to manhood. There are 360-degree videos scattered throughout the exhibits, including the Air Force Pavilion at the Ronald Reagan Library.

    Speaking of 360 videos, the Google Arts and Culture app (available on iOS and Android) also lets you take virtual tours of sites like Mount Rushmore and the Lincoln Memorial, so you can feel free to nerd out from the comfort of your desk or couch.

    Whatever your views are on the political state of the country, checking out these displays might give you a dose of inspiration and perspective. At the very least, you can appreciate the cuteness of furry creatures who used to reside in the White House.

    Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/02/15/presidential-lives-gallery-google-arts/

    Posted on

    Updated: 11 more Jewish Community Centers received bomb threats, bringing total to 59

    (CNN)Samantha Taylor was at Orlando’s Jewish Community Center for a morning meeting when she heard reports of a bomb threat crackle from the director’s walkie-talkie.

    Her daughter attends preschool there; she ran to the classroom and evacuated with the students and teachers.
    While police and bomb-sniffing dogs searched the building for several hours, the teachers kept the children calm and happy at a safe spot down the street, Taylor said. No explosives were found.
      On the same day, January 4, an Orlando Chabad center also received a threatening call, marking the first trickle in what would soon swell to waves of calls menacing Jewish institutions across the country.
      In all, 48 JCCs in 26 states and one Canadian province received nearly 60 bomb threats during January, according to the JCCA, an association of JCCs*. Most were made in rapid succession on three days: January 9, 18 and 31. A number of JCCs, including Orlando’s, received multiple threats.
      On Monday, another wave of bomb threats hit 11 JCCs across the country, bringing the total to 69 incidents targeting 54 JCCs in 27 states, according to the JCCA.
      Also on Monday, Ivanka Trump,who converted to Judaism, tweeted: “America is a nation built on the principle of religious tolerance. We must protect our houses of worship & religious centers. #JCC.”
      Ivanka Trump is the first member of the Trump family to comment on the bomb threats.
      In a statement, the FBI said the bureau and the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division are “investigating possible civil rights violations in connections with threats to Jewish Community Centers across the country.”
      The JTA, a Jewish news agency, says it has obtained a recording of one of the calls. On it, the caller says a C-4 bomb has been placed in the JCC and that “a large number of Jews are going to be slaughtered.”

      Jewish

      Since the threats began, Kveller has run at least five columns about them. Some of the writers are distraught. “Did the people who decided to call in a bomb threat wish it was real?” asked one mother. “Did they think about my babies and wish that they could really blow them up?”
      Others columnists were more defiant. “I’m not scared to be a proud Jewish mother in the United States of America in 2017,” wrote Jordana Horn, “and neither should you be.”
      Other Jewish mothers say they don’t know what to make of the bomb threats, or how they should react.
      “The question is: How serious is it?” said Elissa Strauss, a parenting columnist for Slate whose son attends a JCC preschool. “That’s what I, as a Jew and a parent, am trying to work out. I don’t think I have a clear understanding of what I’m supposed to do right now, besides not give in.”
      Strauss said the relative lack of media coverage about the threats adds to her perplexity. She’s not alone: “48 U.S. Jewish Centers Received Bomb Threats in Past Month,” ran a headline in Haaretz. “‘Why Is No One Talking About This?'”
      Parents are asking: Is it because no bombs have exploded? Because the protection of children is seen primarily as a “women’s issue”? Because Trump’s chaotic new administration dominates news cycles? Or because JCC leaders are trying to quiet the story for fear of panicking parents and losing students?
      Ivy Harlev, director of the JCC in Wilmington, Delaware, which received two bomb threats last month, says she is “torn” about whether more media should have covered the threats.
      “I don’t want that kind of negative attention, but I want to make sure that people know that we are a secure place, and that we have the support of local law enforcement.”
      Like many JCCs that have received threats, Harlev’s quickly assembled a town hall so parents could question administrators, local police and FBI representatives. Two families decided to withdraw their children from the JCC’s early childhood education program, Harlev said.
      In Albany, Orlando and elsewhere, JCC staffers have tried to bolster security — and ease parents’ peace of mind — by closing entrances, blocking phone calls from unknown numbers and posting bollards to block vehicles from getting close to their buildings.
      At least one family was satisfied by the changes.
      For nearly four years, Melissa Braillard, a mother of two in Orlando, had sent her children to the JCC. She knew and liked the teachers, the administrators, the other parents and their children.
      “I feel like I had a support system, and people cared for us.”
      But after the third bomb threat and weeks of worrying, Braillard removed her children from the JCC. “I need to keep my kids safe,” she thought at the time.
      A few weeks later, though, Braillard agreed to return to the Orlando JCC to see its security improvements. She came away impressed.
      Because her son would be starting kindergarten soon at another school anyway, he is not returning to the JCC. But her daughter will be back in the classroom on Monday.
      On March 8, the Orlando JCC is holding a fundraiser, where it hopes to raise $200,000 to help the center break even for the year. It has already found three donors to match donations, potentially quadrupling the windfall.
      Meanwhile, parents like Taylor, the mother who witnessed the first bomb threat, are determined to keep the doors open. “Our JCC isn’t going anywhere,” she said, “and that’s the most important message.”
      *This piece has been updated to reflect the number of states where JCCs have received bomb threats, per the JCC Association of North America.

      Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/16/living/jcc-bomb-threats-anti-semitism/index.html

      Posted on

      ‘Transilient’ photo series documents the true lives of transgender Americans

      Sharing your story of struggle and resilience can be revolutionary especially when lives like yours are consistently misrepresented.

      An ongoing photo and interview series called Transilient taps into that idea, documenting the diverse lives and experiences of transgender and gender-nonconforming people around the U.S. The series aims to challenge mainstream media representation of trans lives, and prove that trans people are more than just their experiences with gender.

      Transilient is created for the community, by the community, featuring portrait-style photos of trans people along with excerpted, unedited interviews with those depicted.

      The result is a raw and powerful Humans of New York-esque documentation of trans Americans’ everyday lives.

      Griffin of Denver: “Do you guys remember what ‘scene’ is? … I was really recognized on MySpace for that … I had no friends in my town, but I had 10,000 friends on the internet.”

      Image: Transilient

      The goal of the series, according to creators Basil Soper and Johanna Case, is to change the “trans narrative” one interview at a time. To do this, the pair shifts the focus away from a person’s experience with gender with their questions, instead focusing on the many other aspects of an interviewee’s life.

      “We bring so much magnificence and creativity to the world and that is overlooked so often.”

      “The project intends to destroy a notion that trans folks are only trans and do not have a much going on outside of their gender identity,” the creators wrote on the project site.

      Transilient‘s first stage, shot last summer, documents 37 different people living in various areas of the country. Soper and Case spent June and July 2016 traveling around the U.S. along with their 8-year-old Carolina dog, Yepper to meet with those featured.

      The duo is currently crowdfunding to continue the project this summer, and they also hope to integrate video into the next stage.

      Anna Scofield of New York City: “I love how skating shapes my femininity. I feel more like a hardcore girl, and its good because I feel like a riot girl at heart.

      Image: Transilient

      Soper, who transitioned to male while living in North Carolina, was inspired to create the series with Case (who describes themself as “genderfluid-ish”) after seeing an uptick in mainstream interest in trans lives and stories. This increase in fascination with the trans experience came after legislation like the state’s “bathroom bill” law, HB2, made headlines.

      As the battle for trans rights became more mainstream in North Carolina, Soper and Case, who are in a relationship, were often interviewed on their partnership and lives. But in the process, Case says they were often asked invasive questions about Soper’s body and their sex lives.

      “The law provoked the media to gush trans stories but they were written from the cisgender gaze and I was tired of it,” Soper says.

      Riley Johnson of Chicago on becoming a dad: “It was the realization that ‘Holy crap! there is now this little person who I am responsible for.’ It was almost up there with wedding-vomit-inducing jitters.”

      Image: Transilient

      The trans community has a long history of being mischaracterized and misrepresented in mainstream media. Many stories circulate that focus on their experience with gender alone, often gawking over the process of transitioning.

      Since only 16 percent of people report having ever met a trans person, media representation is often how non-trans society forms opinions about trans rights and politics.

      “If the trans community has no opportunity to represent itself, it’s easy for people to make snap judgments about the community without ever really having a conversation with anyone who has transitioned,” Case says.

      Samson Holloway of Columbia: “My favorite tattoo, is actually, um, one that goes across my chest… I got it the day after I finished my last round of chemotherapy. I wasnt supposed to because with chemo youre not supposed to get a tattoo. But I did it anyway.”

      Image: Transilient

      Transilient is Soper and Case’s attempt to provide a comprehensive introduction to members of the community. Through the series, they hope to assert that trans people may have a complex gender history, but they otherwise lead very ordinary lives.

      “Trans people are everywhere,” Case says. “Trans people serve in the military. Love their moms. Work on themselves. Have their hearts broken. Dote on their cats and dogs. Obsess over Star Wars. Basically, trans people are not all that different than you.”

      Brodey Bartlett of Omaha: Thats a question I get: ‘Why did you transition if youre just going to date guys?’ Because, Im a guy and I also like guys. Thats why.”

      Image: Transilient

      The series is still relatively new and the effort to shift public opinion is no small feat. But Soper and Case say they’re determined to document life as their community experiences it to help move the needle.

      “We bring so much magnificence and creativity to the world and that is overlooked so often,” Soper says. “I just think the trans community is one of the most lovely, diverse, strong, intelligent and compassionate groups of people Ive ever encountered. We are sincerely beautiful.”

      Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/02/15/transilient-photo-series-transgender/

      Posted on

      24 ways your life rapidly changed after Trump’s election

      Image: ambar del moral/mashable

      For many of us, it’s becoming increasingly hard to remember the time before Donald Trump was elected that rosy, carefree time before we were on the verge of war with five different countries and our president knew that Frederick Douglass was dead.

      Ah, the good old days.

      Trump’s presidency, just weeks old, has been so brutal and swift that it’s been hard for the millions of Americans who oppose him to think of a time where his Twitter feed didn’t consume all of our mental energy. Remember when you could turn to Facebook without a zillion different people asking you to call your Senator to oppose Betsy DeVos NOW NOW NOW?

      Yeah, me neither.

      Here’s a look at unpredictable, unspeakable ways your mind has likely changed, pre and post Trump’s election.

      1. The question: “How are you?”

      Pre: “I’m [good/fine/not listening]”

      Post: “You’re going to have refrain from that question for the next four years.”

      2. John McCain:

      Pre: “He’s lost all credibility.”

      Post: “YOU ARE THE ONLY PERSON CAPABLE OF SAVING US FROM THE DARKNESS.”

      3. While you’re on the train:

      Image: ambar del moral/mashable

      4. Nuclear war:

      Pre: “In the past!”

      Post: “On the table.”

      5. Dogs:

      Pre: “If only we could talk to each other!”

      Post: “Thank god you understand none of this.”

      6. Sleeping:

      Pre:

      Post:

      7. New York Times notifications:

      Pre: “Obama was slow in signing that bill I’m outraged!”

      Post: “Oh, the House just dropped a ban on the mentally ill having guns – HEY THIS ONE’S NOT SO BAD!”

      8. Paul Ryan:

      Pre: “The f*cking worst.”

      Post: “The f*cking worst.”

      9. Facebook photos of babies:

      Pre: “Aww, your baby is sooo cute!”

      Post: “Why are you posting this, do you not realize that the world is burning down, I hate you.”

      10. Authoritarianism:

      Pre: “God that is devastating.”

      Post: “Okay, it can’t be THAT BAD I mean people live in Russia, right?”

      11. Bananas:

      Pre:

      Image: Westend61 Images / AP Images

      Post:

      Image: olivier douliery/Sipa USA via AP

      12. While you’re in the shower

      Pre: “I need more soap.”

      Post: “I need to get out of this country before it becomes North Korea.”

      13. Your senator:

      Pre: “Who’s that guy again?”

      Post: “PRIMARY HIM.”

      14. Twitter:

      Pre: “Such a fun place, love following all my fav comedians there!”

      Post:

      15. Travel:

      Pre: “Where’s the best place to escape from work?

      Post: “Where’s the best place to escape from nuclear war?”

      17. Maxine Waters:

      Pre: “Who’s that?”

      Post: “THERE IS NO GOD ONLY YOU.”

      18. Dieting:

      Pre: “God, I really need to get on a diet.”

      Post:

      19. The Gym:

      Pre: “Need. To. Go!”

      Post: “If I get up from my bed today that counts as moving, right?”

      20. The Cold War:

      Pre: “We won!”

      Post: “We lost!”

      21. Mike Pence:

      Pre: “Satan on earth.”

      Post: “I pray for the day you become leader of the free world.”

      22. Time:

      Pre: “Just flies by!”

      Post:

      23. Chuck Schumer

      Pre: “Wait, what does that guy do again?”

      Post:

      24. The election:

      Image: ambar del moral/mashable

      Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/02/15/ways-brain-changed-trump-election/

      Posted on

      Jumpers are knitted for ‘discriminated-against’ unwanted dogs – BBC News

      Image copyright Ross Johnston
      Image caption Springer spaniel Barney in one of the dogs to receive a new jumper

      Jumpers are being knitted for “discriminated-against” dogs that an animal welfare charity finds among the hardest to rehome.

      Dogs with dark-coloured coats are being overlooked at Scottish SPCA centres in Inverness and Caithness.

      It is thought the dogs’ features do not show as well in photograph appeals for new homes as lighter-coated pooches.

      Scottish Women’s Institute groups, including those in Aberdeenshire, have been knitting the eye-catching jumpers.

      The knitting effort forms part of celebrations marking 100 years of the SWI.

      Image copyright Ross Johnston
      Image caption SWI member Winnie Anderson and Barney

      Dogs in the care of the SSPCA at Drumoak, near Banchory, were among the first to get the colourful overcoats, designed to draw greater attention to the animals.

      The SSPCA describes the problem of rehoming dark-coated dogs as Black Dog Syndrome.

      The charity said that, in photographs, the dogs’ features and personalities do not show up as they do for dogs with lighter coats.

      SSPCA superintendent Sharon Comrie said: “This syndrome really does affect the adoption of animals in our care and, through no fault of their own, black dogs are almost always the last to find new homes.

      “It’s a really creative idea to knit coloured jackets to show these dogs off to their best advantage.

      Image copyright Ross Johnston
      Image caption Lurcher cross Archie sporting a colourful woolly overcoat

      “Knowing that the SWI has members in every part of Scotland, many of whom are extremely dextrous when it comes to traditional crafts, means that we’ll hopefully be able to help animals in the nine rescue and rehoming centres we operate in Scotland.

      “Knitted jackets will be ideal because they will be soft on the skin, have an element of give and stretch, and can be created in any, or many, colours of wool.”

      SWI national chairwoman Christine Hutton said: “Some of Scotland’s top craftswomen are making multi-coloured dog coats in aid of homeless pets desperately seeking loving new homes – to boost their appeal and help them become rehomed more quickly.”

      Related Topics

      Read more: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-38990968